DateTime::__construct

date_create

(PHP 5 >= 5.2.0)

DateTime::__construct -- date_createReturns new DateTime object

Description

Object oriented style

public DateTime::__construct ([ string $time = "now" [, DateTimeZone $timezone = NULL ]] )

Procedural style

DateTime date_create ([ string $time = "now" [, DateTimeZone $timezone = NULL ]] )

Returns new DateTime object.

Parameters

time

A date/time string. Valid formats are explained in Date and Time Formats.

Enter NULL here to obtain the current time when using the $timezone parameter.

timezone

A DateTimeZone object representing the timezone of $time.

If $timezone is omitted, the current timezone will be used.

Note:

The $timezone parameter and the current timezone are ignored when the $time parameter either is a UNIX timestamp (e.g. @946684800) or specifies a timezone (e.g. 2010-01-28T15:00:00+02:00).

Return Values

Returns a new DateTime instance. Procedural style returns FALSE on failure.

Errors/Exceptions

Emits Exception in case of an error.

Changelog

Version Description
5.3.0 If time contains an invalid date/time format, then an exception is now thrown. Previously an error was emitted.

Examples

Example #1 DateTime::__construct() example

Object oriented style

<?php
try {
    
$date = new DateTime('2000-01-01');
} catch (
Exception $e) {
    echo 
$e->getMessage();
    exit(
1);
}

echo 
$date->format('Y-m-d');
?>

Procedural style

<?php
$date 
date_create('2000-01-01');
if (!
$date) {
    
$e date_get_last_errors();
    foreach (
$e['errors'] as $error) {
        echo 
"$error\n";
    }
    exit(
1);
}

echo 
date_format($date'Y-m-d');
?>

The above examples will output:

2000-01-01

Example #2 Intricacies of DateTime::__construct()

<?php
// Specified date/time in your computer's time zone.
$date = new DateTime('2000-01-01');
echo 
$date->format('Y-m-d H:i:sP') . "\n";

// Specified date/time in the specified time zone.
$date = new DateTime('2000-01-01', new DateTimeZone('Pacific/Nauru'));
echo 
$date->format('Y-m-d H:i:sP') . "\n";

// Current date/time in your computer's time zone.
$date = new DateTime();
echo 
$date->format('Y-m-d H:i:sP') . "\n";

// Current date/time in the specified time zone.
$date = new DateTime(null, new DateTimeZone('Pacific/Nauru'));
echo 
$date->format('Y-m-d H:i:sP') . "\n";

// Using a UNIX timestamp.  Notice the result is in the UTC time zone.
$date = new DateTime('@946684800');
echo 
$date->format('Y-m-d H:i:sP') . "\n";

// Non-existent values roll over.
$date = new DateTime('2000-02-30');
echo 
$date->format('Y-m-d H:i:sP') . "\n";
?>

The above example will output something similar to:

2000-01-01 00:00:00-05:00
2000-01-01 00:00:00+12:00
2010-04-24 10:24:16-04:00
2010-04-25 02:24:16+12:00
2000-01-01 00:00:00+00:00
2000-03-01 00:00:00-05:00

See Also

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User Contributed Notes 7 notes

up
8
joel dot kallman at gmail dot com
2 years ago
A definite "gotcha" (while documented) that exists in the __construct is that it ignores your timezone if the $time is a timestamp.  While this may not make sense, the object does provide you with methods to work around it.

<?php
// New Timezone Object
$timezone = new DateTimeZone('America/New_York');

// New DateTime Object
$date =  new DateTime('@1306123200', $timezone);   

// You would expect the date to be 2011-05-23 00:00:00
// But it actually outputs 2011-05-23 04:00:00
echo $date->format('Y-m-d H:i:s');

// You can still set the timezone though like so...       
$date->setTimezone($timezone);

// This will now output 2011-05-23 00:00:00
echo $date->format('Y-m-d H:i:s');
?>
up
8
cHao
2 years ago
There's a reason for ignoring the time zone when you pass a timestamp to __construct.  That is, UNIX timestamps are by definition based on UTC.  @1234567890 represents the same date/time regardless of time zone.  So there's no need for a time zone at all.
up
5
kendsnyder at gmail dot com
4 years ago
The theoretical limits of the date range seem to be "-9999-01-01" through "9999-12-31" (PHP 5.2.9 on Windows Vista 64):

<?php

$d
= new DateTime("9999-12-31");
$d->format("Y-m-d"); // "9999-12-31"

$d = new DateTime("0000-12-31");
$d->format("Y-m-d"); // "0000-12-31"

$d = new DateTime("-9999-12-31");
$d->format("Y-m-d"); // "-9999-12-31"

?>

Dates above 10000 and below -10000 do not throw errors but produce weird results:

<?php

$d
= new DateTime("10019-01-01");
$d->format("Y-m-d"); // "2009-01-01"

$d = new DateTime("10009-01-01");
$d->format("Y-m-d"); // "2009-01-01"

$d = new DateTime("-10019-01-01");
$d->format("Y-m-d"); // "2009-01-01"

?>
up
2
RussellG
6 months ago
Although this function throws an exception on invalid $time values (empty strings, for example), the exception can't be caught because it's a fatal exception. Use functions such as checkdate() and strtotime() to validate the string first. Example #1 should be changed to remove the try/catch block, since it's misleading.
up
2
Tim Strehle
3 years ago
"The $timezone parameter and the current timezone are ignored when the $time parameter […] is a UNIX timestamp."

Watch out – this means that these two are NOT equivalent, they result in different timezones (unless your current timezone is GMT):

<?php
$d
= new DateTime(); $d->setTimestamp($t);
echo
$o->format('O');
// +0200

$d = new DateTime('@' . $t);
echo
$o->format('O');
// +0000
?>
up
2
kendsnyder at gmail dot com
4 years ago
Also forgot to mention, that MySQL "zeroed" dates do not throw an error but produce a non-sensical date:

<?php

$d
= new DateTime("0000-00-00");
$d->format("Y-m-d"); // "-0001-11-30"

?>

Another good reason to write your own class that extends from DateTime.
up
0
Dimitar Stoichev
15 hours ago
Be careful working with MySQL dates representing point of transition to Daylight Saving Time.
The constructor of DateTime will convert timezone abbreviation to DST but not the time.

<?php

$timeZone
= new DateTimeZone('Europe/Sofia');
           
$transitionToDst = '2014-03-30 03:00:00';

$date = new DateTime($transitionToDst, $timeZone);

// Outputs: Sun Mar 30, 2014 3:00:00 EEST
// Correct: Sun Mar 30, 2014 4:00:00 EEST
echo $date->format('D M j, Y G:i:s T') . '<br>';

// Explicitly setting timezone or adding one second fixes this
$cloneForAdding = clone $date;

$date->setTimezone($timeZone);

// Outputs: Sun Mar 30, 2014 4:00:00 EEST
echo $date->format('D M j, Y G:i:s T') . '<br>';

$cloneForAdding->add(new DateInterval('PT1S'));

// Outputs: Sun Mar 30, 2014 4:00:01 EEST
echo $cloneForAdding->format('D M j, Y G:i:s T');

?>
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